Posts Tagged ‘Halloween’

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Fall Flower Trends

by Leanne Kesler on September 17, 2015 at 11:03 am

Autumn Roses — Leanne and David Kesler, Floral Design Institute, Inc., in Portland, OregonThe seasons are changing … the hot and dry days of summer are cooling. Mother Nature has her paintbrush at work adding vibrant color to the woodlands. Florists, too, are embracing the changing seasons. The traditional favorites, sunflowers, chrysanthemums, berries and late harvest garden roses are abundant. Add to this the new and fabulous floral treasures of thornless blackberries, textural celosia, autumn-hued orchids and exotic pincushion protea, and you have found the delights of the season. Colors for autumn 2015 are rich and lustrous. Fire hues of red, orange and yellow are updated with sophisticated touches of metallic copper, gold and silver.  Read More

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Boo-ti-ful Halloween Parties

by J. Robbin Yelverton on October 24, 2014 at 8:35 am

Halloween-FBIt’s time to get your black and orange on, light up those pumpkins and sharpen those sweet tooth fangs. Halloween is hiding just around the corner! Planning a party with friends? Halloween can be one of the easiest and most fun events to pull out your decorating magic tricks.

Let’s first start with the front door. Creating a fun and freaky entrance always sets the mood for the party. Go traditional with corn stalks, jack-o’-lanterns and spider webs, or go all out with animated creatures, lighting and sound effects. It cannot be too over the top. Just be careful with actual live candles. Make sure you are fire-safe with candles in fire-resistant containers of glass or metal.

With a few well-placed accents, some sheer draping over lamps and plenty of candlelight, your living room can take on the look of a suitable “parlor” of horror. Hanging black sheer or lace over mirrors as they used to do back in the day for funerals also adds a spooky touch. Throw in a couple of inexpensive strobe lights, and your haunted home is set. Read More

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Nothing says Halloween like our friend the pumpkin. From a decorative Jack-o’-Lanterns to tasty pies. Native to North American this versatile squash is used as food and recreation. For carving, pumpkin-chunkin (world record at over 4,000 ft.), pies, breads, muffins, pancakes and lattes, it sure gets around. Originating in Ireland and Scotland, carved pumpkins made their United States debut around 1866. They’ve been said to protect your home against the undead and ward off evil spirits. The world’s largest Jack-o’-Lantern weighed in at 1,469 pounds and was grown in Pennsylvania, not Transylvania. Just hack off the top, scoop out the inside flesh, carve out a scary face and put in a candle.  Now your front porch is ready to greet little ghosts and candy eating goblins on a moonlit chilly late October night. Read More

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Decorating Home for Halloween

by Leanne Kesler on October 22, 2013 at 9:36 am

Autumn Pumpkin — David Kesler, Floral Design Institute, Inc., in Portland, Ore.I am certainly one to fill my house with seasonal decorations, and Halloween is no exception. Corn stalks, spiders and web. Pumpkins, gourds and Indian corn, too. Dahlias, sunflowers and hydrangeas. Oh! I get so excited just typing the words.

My home is an “autumn” home. Its red walls, warm woods and black furniture welcome the traditional Halloween look. A pumpkin hollowed out and filled with fiery colored flowers, rose hips, cattails and autumn leaves greets guests at the front door. Read More

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Pumpkin Flower Vases

by Lisa Greene on October 7, 2013 at 3:55 pm

I love filling my home with flowers, and in the fall, I love displaying flowers in pumpkins. It’s a fun, festive treat for the season, and the kids enjoy it, too. Making a pumpkin vase is pretty easy:


  • Select a pumpkin. I find sugar pumpkins also known as pie pumpkins) work better than decorative pumpkins typically used for making jack-o-lanterns. Whichever pumpkin you pick, get one that sits flat and sturdy.
  • Cut off the top, and scoop out pulp and seeds.

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